Propel ATL

  • published Peachtree Street for people: sign the letter in Blog 2022-05-06 08:58:54 -0400

    Peachtree Street for people: sign the letter

    Deep-pocketed yet narrow veins of opposition to safe and complete streets and people-centered design must not be allowed to dictate the design of public spaces.

    In March, after learning that the Peachtree Shared Street pilot would be removed, we joined other advocates in calling on the City of Atlanta to demonstrate its commitment to creating a Peachtree Street for people. Now it’s May, and we believe it’s time to make the next steps for this project official and to regain momentum. 

    Read more

  • A Vote for Funding: Expectations, Past Realities, Future Need

    Have you ever wanted more sidewalks, bike / Light Individual Transportation lanes, and safer streets in Atlanta? 

    On May 24th, you will have the opportunity to vote on three ballot measures that will put over $460M over five years toward vital transportation projects in Atlanta, as part of an overall $750M infrastructure program. 

    Read more

  • published Transit Advocacy Manager in Jobs and Internships 2022-04-21 10:06:22 -0400

    Job Opportunity

    TRANSIT ADVOCACY MANAGER

     

    Organization: Atlanta Bicycle Coalition Job type: full-time salary, exempt
    Job title: Transit Advocacy Manager Compensation: $52,700 - $59,600 + benefits
    Reports to: Executive Director Location: Fully remote office, candidates must reside in MARTA service area


    Do you believe that Atlanta’s streets and transit systems should be safe, inclusive, and thriving spaces for people to ride, walk, and roll? The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition is seeking a Transit Advocacy Manager to join its energetic and focused staff.

    We’re looking for a team member with a demonstrated enthusiasm for our mission and vision and a commitment to our guiding principles — particularly the principles related to social and racial justice. Guided by the big-picture goals of our strategic plan, the ideal candidate will be able to adeptly manage the breadth of their responsibilities as an essential member of our Advocacy Team.

    Our staff relies on accountability and collaboration to achieve effectiveness. Top candidates for this position exercise exemplary critical thinking skills, thrive in a dynamic environment, and are comfortable working in a small organization.

    The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition is committed to the career development of each staff member and provides an abundance of leadership opportunities.

    Primary Responsibilities

    The Transit Advocacy Manager will lead the fulfillment of our strategic goal to make transit work better for people while elevating the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition’s status as a highly reliable and effective transit advocacy organization. Fulfilling this position on our team will entail the following key responsibilities in addition to other assignments as new priorities emerge:

    • Build and support a diverse coalition of organizations, community advocates, and other stakeholders to advocate for transit service improvements and projects that prioritize equitable outcomes
    • Involve transit riders in advocacy initiatives through direct engagement and storytelling practices
    • Generate and maintain compelling content to support transit initiatives
    • Work collaboratively with Advocacy Campaigns Manager, Advocacy Team, and transit coalition to develop transit campaigns
    • Implement transit campaign tactics, involving the Advocacy Team, our board’s Policy and Infrastructure Committee, advocacy partners, and community advocates
    • Attend transit agency meetings related to our transit priorities, share progress, and provide direction for the Advocacy Team

    Qualifications

    EXPERIENCE

    • Has been instrumental in coalition building, community advocacy, and community engagement initiatives for three or more years
    • Has effectively worked with and on behalf of individuals and communities most impacted by ongoing racial injustices, systemic oppression, and racial disparities
    • Has created compelling public-facing persuasive content, especially written
    • Has been involved academically or professionally in urban transit and transportation policy/planning for a year or more
    • Has regularly ridden transit
    • Has used collaborative project management platforms and digital tools to generate and present work products, organize work, and manage relationships

    KNOWLEDGE

    • Understands how local transit systems and local transit agencies work
    • Recognizes why transit access is key to advancing equity and mobility justice
    • Is current on local context and transit issues
    • Is familiar with Atlanta’s local political and civic landscape
    • Is familiar with Atlanta’s communities, community institutions, and neighborhoods
    • Recognizes and understands Atlanta’s history — especially, its racial disparities and record of "intentional harm perpetrated by white supremacist policies and actions"¹ 

    ¹The Untokening’s Principles of Mobility Justice

    STRENGTHS

    • Is resourceful, self-directed, impact-focused, and enlists critical thinking skills to solve problems
    • Exercises political acumen
    • Has exemplary organizational skills and the ability to effectively manage and deliver on multiple priorities at once in a dynamic environment
    • Is passionate about the transformative potential of transit for equity, climate, health, and access to opportunity
    • Has an enthusiastic and positive attitude about systems change and community perspectives
    • Is service-oriented, highly collaborative, approachable, accountable, and comfortable exchanging constructive feedback

    Workplace and Benefits

    WORKPLACE FORMAT

    Fully remote. Requires some evenings and weekends as well as occasional in-person engagements as necessary for the responsibilities of the position.

    REMOTE WORK STIPEND

    Staff receives a work from home reimbursement as a fixed amount each pay period.

    HEALTH INSURANCE

    Employer pays 50% of each employee’s medical insurance premium, in addition to partial dental and vision, and fully covered basic life and long-term disability insurance.

    PAID LEAVE

    • Annual paid holidays include:
      • two weeks (one in summer, one in winter)
      • approximately 10 recognized holidays
      • four floating days
    • Vacation accrues at the rate of eight hours per 160 hours worked. 
    • Each staff member receives 72 hours of annual wellness leave.
    • Family and bereavement leave policies are provided.

    PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    Each staff member receives bi-weekly career development support from their direct supervisor. Staff also has access to and is encouraged to pursue professional development opportunities.

    ANTI-DISCRIMINATION POLICY

    The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition aims to foster an environment that recognizes, respects and values different backgrounds and talents. We do not discriminate in our staff, board, volunteers, volunteer committees, or recipients of services, and will not tolerate unlawful discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion (including religious dress and grooming), sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, disability, military or veteran status, genetic information, or any other protected category. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment including, but not limited to, hiring, placement, promotion, termination, layoff, recall, transfer, leaves of absence, compensation, and training.

    Apply for this Opportunity

    Email a cover letter and resume along with policy or advocacy-related persuasive writing sample to [email protected] with “Transit Advocacy Manager” in the subject line. In your cover letter, let us know what resonates most with you from our mission, vision, and guiding principles. Include any details that uniquely qualify you for this position. If you need accommodations in the hiring process, please be in touch and we can adapt accordingly. 

    This job was posted on March 18, 2022. Applications are reviewed as received, and the position will remain open until filled.

     


  • published Board Recruitment in About 2022-04-01 13:10:23 -0400

    Recruiting now: Atlanta Bicycle Coalition Governing Board

    Are you passionate about our work and mission and aligned with our values and areas of impact in the strategic plan? Do you have fundraising experience and want to help us develop the resources necessary to achieve our goals? Are you committed to racial justice and interested in how transportation and mobility can advance equity? Are you looking for ways to get more involved in our efforts to build an Atlanta where everyone moves safely, easily, and sustainably throughout the city?

    If so, read on! We're seeking dedicated community members to join our Governing Board. The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition is at a pivotal moment as we grow the organization in order to fulfill our expanded mission: to reclaim Atlanta’s streets as safe, inclusive, and thriving spaces for people to ride, walk, and roll.

    IMG_3598_board-members.jpg

    image: 2018 Governing Board members

    The Governing Board supports our work and provides mission-based leadership and strategic governance. While day-to-day operations are led by the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition's staff, the board-staff relationship is a partnership, and the appropriate involvement of the Board is both critical and expected.

    Governing Board members:

    ✅ Provide leadership, governance, and oversight

    ✅ Serve as a trusted advisor to the staff leadership as they develop and implement the strategic plan

    ✅ Uphold the organization's commitment to racial equity

    ✅ Review outcomes and metrics created to evaluate our impact

    ✅ Approve the annual budget and audit reports; stay informed of and meet all legal and fiduciary responsibilities

    ✅ Serve on one or more committees; serve as an officer if called upon by the Board Chair

    ✅ Represent the organization to stakeholders; act as an ambassador

    ✅ Ensure our commitment to a diverse board and staff that reflect the entirety of the city of Atlanta

    ✅ Consider the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition a philanthropic priority and make annual gifts that reflect that priority

    Desired Skills and Traits

    For the upcoming board cycle we're looking for candidates with experience in one or more of the following:

    • Nonprofit fundraising
    • Financial management
    • Communications and marketing

    Time Commitment

    • Attend quarterly board meetings
    • Join at least one committee and attend monthly meetings 
    • Review agenda and materials prior to all meetings
    • Conduct board work in between meetings as needed

    Committees

    • Finance
    • Fundraising
    • Governance
    • Policy and Infrastructure
    • Marketing and Communications
    • Team Support

    Interested? Sign up below to learn more.

     

    Become a volunteer

  • published Protect Bus & Bike Lanes: Campbellton in Take Action 2022-03-29 17:02:13 -0400

    Protect The Lanes

    Bike/LIT and bus lanes should be painted and protected 

    A line of paint doesn’t do much to prevent people from driving cars or trucks in bike lanes. Instead, physical protection – think concrete barricades, raised curbs, and posts – is what makes bike/LIT lanes safe for everyone. 

    Some of the many who benefit from bike lanes that are protected from motor vehicles: 

    • Kids biking around the neighborhood with friends, experiencing the growing freedom that comes with independent transportation
    • Adults biking or scooting to patronize local businesses 
    • People using the sidewalk – especially older adults, people with disabilities, and children –  who rely on the dedicated space of the sidewalk to easily get around without faster-moving vehicles like bicycles vying for space
    • People driving who rely on easily understood markings and the predictable behavior of other people 
    • Residents and all those who want to use the road safely

    It's unclear if MARTA’s plans for the Campbellton Road transit project include protected bike lanes. The image below from the MARTA project website is of a dedicated bike lane with potential space for physical protection. 

    Image on left from MARTA Campbellton corridor webpage; image on right from NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide

    Bus lanes also need to be protected to prevent misuse. When people driving cars mistakenly use bus lanes, it slows down bus operations. While there are limitations to how much MARTA can do to prevent this, we want to make sure they’ve fully explored the options, such as those identified in the NACTO Transit Street Design Guide. NACTO suggests bus lanes should be painted red, at a minimum, with additional protection options ranging from rumble strips to concrete curbs. 

    Designing the dedicated bus lanes in a way that prevents people driving cars and trucks from using them is a preventative measure - it prevents dangerous traffic interactions, and it also prevents unnecessary police interactions. Relying on enforcement is not a good approach. Let’s prevent these problems before they start. 

    Image from NACTO Transit Street Design Guide

    All of the More MARTA projects funded by voters in 2016 should result in safer and more complete streets that meet a variety of people’s needs. MARTA’s goals for the program include “improve first and last-mile connectivity.” Campbellton is one of the first high-quality, high-frequency transit projects to advance from More MARTA, so it’s important to set a good precedent. 

    Let MARTA know people using bike and bus lanes need better protection than paint alone. We need barriers that will maintain these lanes for their intended uses - for sustainable transportation - and preserve the safety of people using them.

    You can help! 

    The Campbellton corridor transit project is at a key inflection point, so we need you to weigh in now!

    Use this form to customize an email to the MARTA project manager sharing your experience and the need to protect bike and bus lanes. Click here to take action: https://p2a.co/DBdRnwh

     


    References


  • published Peachtree Street for people in Blog 2022-03-14 10:08:55 -0400

    Peachtree Street for people

    This week the City of Atlanta announced it would remove the Peachtree Street shared space pilot project. The three-block pilot was intended to test the benefits of converting a general traffic lane to space for people outside of cars. By most accounts, the project achieved its goals – 27% more people walking on the street and 11% fewer motor vehicles – but also attracted some powerful detractors

    Read more

  • published Meet our Bike Instructors in Classes 2022-02-25 13:29:23 -0500

    Meet your instructors and sign up for classes

    James Tyler:

    James Tyler is the Founder and Executive Director of the Urban Creek Conservation and Recreation Corps, a 501©(3) non-profit organization. Urban Creek’s mission is to provide Atlanta’s legacy neighborhood youth with environmental science, education, and recreational experiences in the parks and green spaces of Atlanta. The non-profit organization aims to develop a youth corps that is passionate about the outdoors and is qualified to identify native species of plants/animals as well as aid in the maintenance of green spaces.

    Before starting Urban Creek, James had over twenty-three years of distinguished service as an elementary and middle school educator in Bankhead, Vine City, and Southwest Atlanta schools. He retains his teaching credentials and is a certified bicycle instructor through the League of American Bicyclists. James now coaches youth from this same region in the sport of mountain bike riding and long-distance road bicycling (e.g. the Bicycle Ride Across Georgia and the Velocity ride). He also focuses on projects that leverage cycling as an entry point into physical activity, environmental education, and historical learning.

    In addition to being an outdoor enthusiast, James is also an avid genealogist. Most recently, he organized a group of citizens (including the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society) to rescue and preserve the Dudley Cemetery, an African-American burial ground in Southwest Atlanta that dates back to at least the end of the Civil War. In his free time, you can find James dancing Salsa and Kizomba in Atlanta or camping and hiking outdoors whenever he has an opportunity to visit his hometown in Wyoming.

    Read James Tyler's tips and tricks for biking in Atlanta in this AJC article!

    Anthony Allen:

    Anthony Allen has been instructing classes with Atlanta Bicycle Coalition since 2019, leading the Shifting Gears Program, and also supporting the Atlanta Streets Alive Project. He is currently an active instructor for three different programs: Bike Family, True Beginners, and City Cycling.

    Musician, athlete, mentor, Anthony is passionate about life, community, and the service of others. Driven by a larger sense of connection and purpose, he has been a consistent champion for those in need. From working with adults with disabilities to coaching and mentoring students of all ages, Anthony has always demonstrated an ability to connect with people of all demographics.

    An avid cyclist and yoga practitioner, Anthony use these activities to introduce mindfulness as a method of redirection, in order to control thoughts and emotions with SEL students.

    Anthony is open, honest, and willing to help anyone realize their full potential.

    Shakeesha Jeffries:

    Shakeesha is a woman of many trades. Yoga, wellness, photography, and cycling are her passions. She is a Kundalini Yoga instructor and holistic health guide with her company Look Within Yoga & Wellness, teaching yoga and health in her community for over a decade at www.lookwithinyoga.com. She has been a photographer for 20 years, specializing in portraiture, documentary photography, and light painting photography

    Shakeesha has been an avid bike rider since her father took her on long bike rides as a child, and now as a mother of two children, she has brought her love of cycling to her community and her family. Working with the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition since 2016 as one of the original Bike Champions, encouraging biking in urban neighborhoods on the westside of Atlanta and engaging with the communities affected by the most dangerous streets in Atlanta. Since then she has continued to work with Atlanta Bicycle Coalition as an instructor in the Shifting Gears initiative, True Beginners, Bike Family, and City Cycling, as well as starting another business, Lane Share Education, teaching children and adults how to ride bikes, and how to ride safely in city streets. Shakeesha recently earned her LCI (League Certified Instructor) certification from the League of American Bicyclists. She looks forward to starting a community bike club for children in the near future.

    Shakeesha rides weekly with many different cycling groups in Atlanta, Dopepedalers, RBG, APB, Critical Mass… as well as with friends and family. On Instagram, she’s also known as the 'Bike Pusha’, because she is always trying to get everyone that she meets and knows on a bicycle. She shares biking with others, for more Earth-friendly ways of transportation, getting healthier, enjoying the outdoors, and for the sheer joy of it. She believes that biking truly makes our world a better place to live.


  • published Sign: 2022 Policy Agenda in Take Action 2022-02-17 15:08:39 -0500

    2022 Policy & Infrastructure Recommendations

    36 signatures

    Explore our recommendations for the City of Atlanta, MARTA, Atlanta Public Schools, Georgia Department of Transportation, and the Georgia Legislature. 

    In 2021 we shared an Equity and Mobility policy agenda representing policy changes we would advocate for during the term of 2021-2025. 

    The list below includes policies and infrastructure projects we believe would advance safe and equitable transportation in 2022. We welcome other policy and infrastructure and will support proposals that help build our vision of an Atlanta where everyone moves safely, easily, and sustainably throughout the city. 

    City of Atlanta

    Explore Recommendations

    Atlanta Public Schools

    Explore Recommendations

    Georgia Department of Transportation

    Explore Recommendations

    Georgia General Assembly

    Explore Recommendations

     

    City of Atlanta

    1. Fund and implement Atlanta Streets Alive as an ongoing and high-frequency program
    2. Fund city infrastructure projects (bond and TSPLOST) that prioritize sidewalks & safe streets for people
    3. Fund Safe Routes to School projects for schools on or near the High-Injury Network in the FY 2023 budget
    4. Adopt Leading Pedestrian Intervals as standard and use signal timing to create safer crossings, starting with schools and transit stops
    5. Decriminalize walking and biking by reforming / deprioritizing enforcement of laws that allow for over-policing of walking, biking, and riding transit
    6. Expand the default 25 mph speed limit adopted in 2020 Vision Zero legislation to cover City of Atlanta streets classified as collectors and minor arterials
    7. Create a Vision Zero plan to eliminate traffic fatalities by prioritizing racial equity and safer street design
    8. Finish projects — including Complete Streets, bike/LIT lanes, and sidewalks — that were promised in the 2015 Renew Atlanta bond, 2016 TSPLOST, and Cycle Atlanta 1.0 and 2.0
    9. Adopt missing middle (MR-MU) or similar zoning proposal to allow more people to live near transit
    10. Routinely maintain bike/Light Individual Transportation (LIT) lanes 

     

    MARTA

    1. Define equity and reduce inequities in transportation through redesign of the bus network
    2. Adopt an equitable, flexible transit fare structure that makes transit affordable for families and free for young people
    3. Implement More MARTA projects with dedicated bus lanes or right of way, dedicated bike lanes, and accessible sidewalks
    4. Redevelop land near transit into affordable housing

     

    Atlanta Public Schools

    1. Implement automated speed cameras in school zones equitably and transparently, to protect the lives of students, families, and staff, and to prevent unnecessary police interactions

     

    Georgia Department of Transportation

    1. Start community engagement processes for safety projects on Donald L. Hollowell Parkway and Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard
    2. Prioritize safety projects for Moreland Avenue and all state routes on the High-Injury Network
    3. Adopt Leading Pedestrian Intervals as the standard for crossings and uses signal timing to give people walking priority and create safer crossings, starting with schools and transit stops
    4. Routinely maintain bike/Light Individual Transportation (LIT) lanes 
    5. Require safe temporary accommodations for people walking, using wheelchairs, biking, or scooting when sidewalks or bike lanes are closed for construction

     

    Georgia General Assembly

    1. Add sidewalk repairs to the definition of roadway maintenance
    2. Decriminalize walking and biking by reforming or deprioritizing enforcement of laws that allow for over-policing 
    3. Adopt policies limiting pursuits except when a suspect poses a grave and imminent threat to the public

     

     

    Add signature

  • published Priorities in About 2022-02-14 12:37:55 -0500


  • published Take the 2022 Bus Challenge in Take Action 2022-01-31 17:04:48 -0500

    TRANSIT EQUITY DAY: TAKE THE BUS CHALLENGE

    24 votes

    February 4, 2022 | Take the Challenge

     

    Transit Equity Day

    Transit Equity Day is a national day of action to commemorate Rosa Parks' birthday by declaring that public transit is a civil right. This day of action is organized by a network of transit rider unions, community organizations, environmental groups, and labor unions.

    February 4 was chosen because Rosa Parks is an iconic figure among many of the civil rights era who chose the tactic of refusing to give up her seat on the bus. This act of resistance highlights the rights of all people to high-quality public transportation powered by clean and renewable energy.

    Transit Equity Day supports a just transition from the fossil fuel economy to clean, renewable energy as a way to confront the climate crisis. A just transition also requires that we uphold worker and civil rights: everyone should have access to free or affordable public transportation regardless of age, race, or class. Finally, a just transition means supporting the rights of workers to organize. 

     

    Partner Organizations

     

    To officials: will you take the Challenge?

    1. Ride the bus to and from work or wherever you go on Friday, February 4th in honor of Rosa Parks’ birthday
    2. Talk about your experience on social media to show solidarity with everyone who relies on transit to get around every day. Use hashtags #TransitEquityDay #TakeTransitATL 
    3. Inform your constituents about what’s happening with transit in our communities (we made a list to make it easy). Be sure to talk about MARTA's bus network redesign, NextGen Bus, that's underway, and how it could affect/benefit riders. 
    4. Adopt a resolution recognizing Transit Equity Day on February 4th, 2022. Thank you Atlanta City Council for adopting Resolution 3053 expressing support for the call to observe a day of action on public transportation as a civil right. The measure passed with 14 yeas and 1 nay. 
    6. Take transit as much as possible throughout the month and beyond. Keep sharing stories of your own experiences as well as those of the riders you meet.
    7. Vote for transit equity: more funding for transit and projects that address inequities in our systems and create a more equitable future.

    Who's pledging?

    • Atlanta Council President Doug Shipman
    • Atlanta Councilmember Post 2 At-Large Matt Westmoreland
    • Atlanta City Councilmember District 1 Jason Winston
    • Atlanta Councilmember District 2 Amir Farokhi (Transportation Committee Chair)
    • Atlanta Councilmember District 4 Jason Dozier
    • Atlanta Councilmember District 5 Liliana Bakhtiari
    • Atlanta Councilmember District 11 Marci Collier Overstreet
    • Atlanta Councilmember District 12 Antonio Lewis
    • Atlanta Department of Transportation Commissioner Josh Rowan
    • MARTA Interim General Manager / Chief Executive Officer Collie Greenwood

    To transit riders: challenge your elected officials!

    • Contact your officials and ask them to take the challenge!
    • We’ve asked our elected officials to take the #TransitEquityDay Bus Challenge by taking public transit to work, run errands, and other activities in their daily lives to experience firsthand what it’s like to navigate bus and train lines in Metro Atlanta. Not only can you join Atlanta Mayor Andre Dickens in taking the bus to work, but you may run into Councilmember Jason Dozier while waiting at a stop or Representative Bee Nguyen on her way to the Capitol. If you spot your elected official participating in the challenge, post a pic on social with the hashtag #TakeTransitATL and #RidingWithJason or #RidingWithBee. 

    • Even if you don’t see any officials out and about, you can still participate in the discussion with them by posting your transit commute with #TransitEquityDay #TakeTransitATL and letting everyone know what transit equity means to you. Posts on Instagram and Twitter using the hashtag #TakeTransitATL will appear below: 

     

    Pledge your vote

  • Pedestrian fatalities rise; U.S. DOT announces strategy to eliminate traffic deaths

    Last fall, we alerted you to an alarming rise in pedestrian fatalities. Although we had only partial data at the time, it appeared even more people were losing their lives in needless and preventable ways on streets in Atlanta and across the state. 

    Now we have more information, and it’s worse than it seemed. 

    Read more

  • published LIT/bike Mileage in Resources 2022-01-12 12:04:16 -0500

    City of Atlanta Light Individual Transportation (LIT) / Bicycle Infrastructure Mileage

     

    Bicycle Facility Mileage Aug 2015 Jan 2017 Jan 2018 Jan 2019 Jan 2022

    Multi-Use Path

    31 36 42 40* 48

    Bike Lane

    43.4 43.5 46 47 60

    Protected Bike Lane

    1.4 2.7 4 4 7

    Buffered Bike Lane

    1.3 3 5 5 6

    Uphill Bike Lane

    0 3 3 4 7

    Sharrows

    6.4 16 16 18 18

    Total

      104 116 118 146
    Data provided by the City of Atlanta 

    *This figure includes corrections to calculation errors discovered in the City’s bicycle infrastructure data after the release of the 2017 bicycle report. Any inconsistencies between reports are due to those corrections. 

    Additional Resources


  • published Submit: Blocked Sidewalks in Take Action 2021-12-16 21:24:00 -0500

    Unblock the sidewalks and LIT/bike lanes

    Carden Wycoff, Atlanta Bicycle Coalition board member and disability advocate

    Carden Wyckoff, Atlanta Bicycle Coalition board member and disability advocate

    Photo: Ellie Hensley Midtown ATL

    Atlanta’s policy on sidewalk closures is excellent. 

    The City of Atlanta's 2019 Public Right-of-Way Manual states

    "Wherever there is construction activity that impacts the public right-of-way and pedestrian access and flow, a temporary accommodation must be provided to ensure uninterrupted movement of pedestrians along that same route. This is a federal standard defined in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). According to the MUTCD, “When existing pedestrian facilities are disrupted, closed, or relocated in a traffic control zone, the temporary facilities shall be detectable and include accessibility features consistent with the features present in the existing pedestrian facility.” The following Pedestrian Accommodations Policy designates procedures and details to be implemented for the treatment of sidewalks during construction activities. This policy is to be enforced by the Department of Public Works when reviewing plans and inspecting work zones for construction that impacts pedestrian Right-of-Way. This policy applies to all construction and maintenance activities (horizontal and vertical), utility work, landscaping, and any sidewalk, lane, or road closures lasting more than 48 hours in construction duration." 

    From Section 10.2: Accessible Work Zones and Appendix I Pedestrian Accommodations & Work Zones Policy

    Compliance is not.

    The gap between requirements and reality can be glaring. But now, you can help narrow the gap! Help ensure sidewalks remain accessible during construction by using this form to report sidewalks or bike lanes blocked by construction that don't provide safe accommodations. We'll share the locations reported with the City of Atlanta and follow up until access is restored. 

    If the blockage is on a state route, we'll advocate for the Georgia Department of Transportation to provide safe accommodations, but they do not have a policy in place requiring they do so (at least, not yet).

    This effort builds on PEDS' prior work on this issue as we advocate for this and other issues of concern for everyone who walks or uses a wheelchair for mobility.

     

    medium-cropped-sign-in-wrong-direction-more-building-context
    Photo: PEDS volunteers and founder Sally Flocks

  • published Track: Infrastructure in Take Action 2021-12-16 20:51:38 -0500

    Infrastructure project tracker

    Two years later: what’s the status of the corridor projects in Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms’ 2019 Action Plan for Safer Streets Across Atlanta? Find out using our interactive online infrastructure project tracker! Click the arrows at the top left of the map to view the legend and toggle layers on and off. Or, visit the Infrastructure Project Tracker StoryMap for an interactive narrative experience.


    Infrastructure project tracker

    The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition created an online infrastructure project tracker to keep the City of Atlanta accountable for completing approved projects that lead to safe and complete streets. 

    Starting with the Mayor's Action Plan for Safer Streets Across Atlanta, the infrastructure project tracker follows and maps ongoing transportation improvements across Atlanta, such as bike lanes, sidewalks, and trails, and provide up-to-date information about Atlanta's infrastructure projects. Our project tracker also provides opportunities for Atlantans to take action in helping improve or advance projects. 

    Background

    Mayor’s Action Plan for Safer Streets Across Atlanta

    On September 25, 2019, in response to several fatal scooter crashes, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announced the Action Plan for Safer Streets Across Atlanta, a two-year $5-million plan promising to "change our streets by creating safer, dedicated spaces for cyclists and scooter riders." The Plan aimed to "establish new connections between key neighborhoods across the city" and bring "more than 20 miles of safer streets" through accelerated safety improvements and redesigns across 26 Atlanta corridors. According to the Plan, funding would come from “redesigning existing projects, departmental budgets, and community partners.”  

    Cycle Atlanta and Quick Implementation Bicycle Projects 

    The Mayor's Action Plan for Safer Streets includes several projects from 2017’s "quick-build" bicycle projects identified in Cycle Atlanta 2.0,  including Brady Avenue, Central Park Place, Courtland Street, Gilmer Street, Peachtree Street, Porter Place, and Whitehall Street.

    Bike/scooter network

    By the end of 2020, Mayor Bottoms pledged to double Atlanta's on-street protected bike network from 4 to 8 miles, and to triple it to at least a 12-mile network of protected bike lanes by the end of 2021. Our research found that ATLDOT and partner agencies have completed around 11 miles of the Mayor’s Action Plan for Safer Streets’ projected 20+ miles of safer streets to date.

    High-Injury Network

    Six of the Plan's 22 target corridors are part of Atlanta's High-Injury Network (HIN), which includes the city's most dangerous routes for walking and biking. Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard, Lee Street, Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, and Campbellton Road, as well as Cascade Avenue and Dekalb Avenue — two significant corridors we advocated for — are included in the mayor's plan. 

    Despite our call for the City to use the mayor’s plan as an opportunity to prioritize corridors on the High-Injury Network, the Martin Luther King Jr. Drive Improvement Program is the only completed project within the HIN to date. The five remaining streets are currently in the planning and development or design phases of completion. More specifically, the Lee Street project is still in the planning & development stage, while the projects for Campbellton Road, Cascade Road and Avenue, and Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard are in the design phase. 

    Prioritizing projects on the High-Injury Network is critical because of the high risk that more people could be injured or killed on these dangerous streets. For instance, as recently as Wednesday, August 25, 2021, a woman lost her life on Cascade Road while driving

    Action Plan for Safer Streets targeted corridor projects

    In 2021, the Atlanta Department of Transportation (ATLDOT) published an interactive Project Map that allows the public to track the progress of ongoing infrastructure projects across the city. 

    This is a welcome step forward. However, while ATLDOT's map shows many of the Action Plan for Safer Streets' target corridors, some are missing or have minimal information, making the entire target network appear shortened. 

    Based on the available information on ATLDOT's interactive map, five out of 34 of the plan's target projects are complete, while the majority of the targeted routes are still in the design phase, construction phase, or have limited information available. Using our infrastructure project tracker, we found that the Atlanta Department of Transportation (ATLDOT) and partner agencies have completed approximately 11 of the 20 pledged miles between 2019-2021.

    During the City’s infrastructure program meetings in November 2021, we learned that several of these projects are included in the proposed bond and TSPLOST lists that will go to voters for approval in May 2022. While we don't know how mayor-elect Andre Dickens' administration will handle these projects, we're excited to continue keeping track of them.

    Based on our research, the current stages of completion for each project in the Mayor's Action Plan for Safer Streets Across Atlanta are listed below.

    Project completion phases

    Not Started or Limited Information Available:

    • Brady Avenue
    • Georgia Avenue (TSPLOST 2022)
    • McDaniel Street (TSPLOST 2022)
    • Oakland Drive
    • Pryor Street (TSPLOST 2022)

    Planning and Development:

    • Lee Street (barricades were placed along West End MARTA station as an interim solution)

    Design Phase:

    Construction Phase (10.4 miles):

    Complete (11.3 miles):

    Next steps

    Atlantans deserve safer streets. Although COVID-19 set back projects all over the country, we will continue to hold government agencies accountable for building what is planned and sharing timely updates with the public when plans change. 

    Stay tuned for opportunities to take action to advocate for these projects. 

    In the meantime, you can send questions or comments to [email protected] or [email protected], or contact us at [email protected] with feedback.


  • published Engagement Coordinator in Jobs and Internships 2021-12-06 16:28:08 -0500

    Job Opportunity

    ENGAGEMENT COORDINATOR

     

    Organization: Atlanta Bicycle Coalition Job type: 100% full-time, salary, exempt
    Job title: Engagement coordinator Compensation: $42,300 - $47,500 + benefits
    Reports to: Senior engagement manager Location: Fully remote office, candidates must reside in Atlanta metro area

     

    Do you believe that Atlanta’s streets should be safe, inclusive, and thriving spaces for people to ride, walk, and roll? The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition seeks an engagement coordinator to join its energetic and focused staff. 

    We’re looking for a team member with a demonstrated enthusiasm for our mission and vision and a commitment to our guiding principles — particularly the principles related to social and racial justice. Guided by the big-picture goals of our strategic plan, the ideal candidate will be able to adeptly manage the breadth of their responsibilities as an essential member of our advocacy and programs teams.

    Our staff relies on accountability and collaboration to achieve effectiveness. Top candidates for this position exercise exemplary critical thinking skills, thrive in a dynamic environment, and are comfortable working in a small organization. 

    The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition is committed to the career development of each staff member and provides an abundance of leadership opportunities.

    Primary Responsibilities

    The main purpose of the engagement coordinator position is to uphold and advance meaningful connections between Atlanta’s communities and the initiatives of the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition. Our advocacy initiatives include: 

    Fulfilling this position on our team will entail the following key responsibilities in addition to other assignments as priorities emerge:

    • Facilitate base-building, community leadership development, and campaign and program participation — especially, the recruitment of program participants
    • Identify, cultivate, and maintain relationships that engage community members in our campaigns, programs and events
    • Prepare outreach materials related to engagement activities
    • Communicate ideas, challenges, concerns, and other feedback expressed by community partners and program participants to the appropriate internal team members
    • Inform and support planning, implementation, and evaluation of all engagement efforts
    • In collaboration with the program coordinator, manage event and large meeting logistics and operations, including virtual or hybrid events
    • Work with community partners to bridge gaps in understanding of mobility justice issues and opportunities
    • Work collaboratively with staff to integrate The Untokening’s Principles of Mobility Justice into engagement strategies

    Qualifications

     

    EXPERIENCE

    • Has performed relevant community-based work or volunteer management for a minimum of two years 
    • Has organized community-based initiatives
    • Is practiced at organizing and facilitating community/stakeholder meetings
    • Has created compelling public-facing content, especially written
    • Has used collaborative project management platforms and digital tools to generate and present work product, organize work, and manage relationships
    • Is active in a community organization

    KNOWLEDGE

    • Is familiar with Atlanta’s local government, schools, NPU/neighborhood system, and other civic entities
    • Is familiar with Atlanta’s community institutions and community-based organizations
    • Recognizes and understands Atlanta’s history — especially, its racial disparities and record of intentional harm perpetrated by white supremacist policies and actions¹ 
    • Is current on developments, resources, and information related to community engagement principles and strategies
    • Understands function and significance of community-based leadership development

    ¹The Untokening’s Principles of Mobility Justice

    STRENGTHS

    • Practices authentic relationship-building with an emphasis on sustained engagement
    • Is service-oriented, with an enthusiastic and positive attitude about systems change and community perspectives
    • Has exemplary organizational skills and ability to effectively manage and deliver on multiple priorities at once in a dynamic environment
    • Is self-directed, impact-focused, and enlists critical thinking skills to solve problems
    • Is an effective presenter and confident public speaker, both one-on-one and for diverse audiences
    • Successfully navigates challenging conversations, manages conflict, and builds consensus
    • Is approachable, accountable, and comfortable exchanging constructive feedback
    • Is resourceful

    Workplace and Benefits

     

    WORKPLACE FORMAT

    Fully remote, requires some evenings and weekends as well as occasional in-person engagements as necessary for the responsibilities of the position.

    REMOTE WORK STIPEND

    Staff receives a work from home reimbursement as a fixed amount each pay period.

    HEALTH INSURANCE

    Employer pays 50% of each employee’s medical insurance premium in addition to partial dental and fully covered vision, basic life, and long-term disability insurance.

    PAID LEAVE

    • Annual paid holidays include:
      • two weeks (one in summer, one in winter).
      • approximately 10 recognized days.
      • four floating days.
    • Vacation accrues at the rate of eight hours per 160 hours worked. 
    • Each staff member receives 72 hours of annual wellness leave.
    • Family and bereavement leave policies are provided.

    PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    Each staff member receives bi-weekly career development support from their direct supervisor. Staff also has access to and is encouraged to pursue professional development opportunities.

    ANTI-DISCRIMINATION POLICY

    The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition aims to foster an environment that recognizes, respects, and values different backgrounds and talents. We do not discriminate in our staff, board, volunteers, volunteer committees, or recipients of services, and will not tolerate unlawful discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion (including religious dress and grooming), sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, disability, military or veteran status, genetic information, or any other protected category. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment including, but not limited to, hiring, placement, promotion, termination, layoff, recall, transfer, leaves of absence, compensation, and training.

    Apply for this Opportunity

    Email a cover letter, a resume, and your definition of community engagement as well as three engagement strategies to [email protected] with Engagement Coordinator as the subject. In your cover letter, let us know what resonates most with you from our mission, vision, and guiding principles. Include any details that uniquely qualify you for this position. If you need accommodations in the hiring process, please be in touch and we can adapt accordingly. This job was posted on December 6, 2021. Applications are reviewed as received, and the position will remain open until filled.

     


  • Congratulations to the new Atlanta Board of Education!

    The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition congratulates the newly-elected Board of Education for Atlanta Public Schools! Thank you for your tireless commitment to developing and supporting the next generation of leaders.

    Read more

  • Congratulations from the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition to Atlanta’s newly-elected leadership

    Congratulations from the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition to Atlanta’s newly-elected leadership: our 61st Mayor-elect Andre Dickens, Council President-elect Doug Shipman, and seven returning Atlanta City Councilmembers who will be joined by eight new City Councilmembers!

    Read more

  • published Vote YES for infrastructure: May 24 in Take Action 2021-11-23 15:37:00 -0500

    Vote yes for infrastructure funding May 24

    PXL_20220515_220114274_2.jpg

    Have you ever wanted more sidewalks, bike / Light Individual Transportation lanes, and safer streets in Atlanta? 

    On May 24th, you will have the opportunity to vote on three ballot measures that will put over $460M over five years toward vital transportation projects in Atlanta, as part of an overall $750M infrastructure program. 

    Our 2022 policy and infrastructure recommendations called for the City of Atlanta to fund infrastructure projects that prioritize sidewalks & safe streets for people. Let’s see how that worked out. According to the City’s webpage, the $460M in proposed transportation investments include $196.5M for sidewalks and trails and $108M for safe streets projects and protected bike lane projects. Of the $460M in proposed transportation investments, there’s $196.5M for sidewalks and trails and $108M for safe streets projects and protected bike lane projects = 66%. That means two-thirds of the projects prioritize sidewalks and safe streets for people!

    Go to project list

     

    Help ensure these projects are funded and hold elected and appointed officials accountable to build what they said they would build: Vote YES on May 24th.

    Visit sos.ga.gov to register, find your polling place, or access a sample ballot.


    Background on the proposed City Funding programs on the ballot May 24

    On Monday, December 6th, 2021, Atlanta City Council voted to approve two pieces of legislation: 1) Authorizing a TSPLOST (Transportation Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax) and 2) Authorizing an infrastructure bond. Thank you to everyone who asked their City Councilmember to prioritize funding sidewalks and safe streets — several were changes made due to community feedback! Here's our analysis of what's on the lists. 

    Project Lists

    Explore TSPLOST & bond project lists

    Go to project list

    Maps by Quadrant

    Explore where TSPLOST & bond projects are located

    Go to project maps

    Take Action

    Send your feedback to Atlanta City Council with one click

    Contact City Council

    Background & Recommendations

    Learn about our advocacy to fund safe streets and recommendations for this TSPLOST and bond

    Background & recs

    What's Next?

    Read about the legislative process

    Go to next steps

    Explore the Legislation

    Read the full legislation approved by Atlanta City Council 

    Go to legislation


     

    Project Lists: 

    November 22, 2021 project spreadsheet | December 6, 2021 project spreadsheet 


    4 things we're celebrating about the proposed projects:

    1. The totals surpass our goal for the TSPLOST of $150M for sidewalks and $150 million for safe streets.

    Although the overlap between categories on the list makes it somewhat challenging to break the list down by type of infrastructure (sidewalk, bike lane, trail, street, etc.) when combined with the bond-funded projects the totals surpass our goal.

    • $148 Million for new sidewalks, sidewalk repairs, and ADA curb ramps will begin to address Atlanta's tremendous sidewalk backlog, reportedly over $1 Billion and counting, as additional sidewalks fall into disrepair every year. We believe this represents a historic level of sidewalk investment for the City of Atlanta.
    • $102 Million for safer street projects including some that have been on City lists for years, such as Lee St, Whitehall St, Courtland St, Ralph McGill Blvd, and Monroe Dr. The street safety improvements will connect existing safe infrastructure for people walking, riding transit, or using wheelchairs, bikes, scooters, etc., so the impact on the network is cumulatively greater than any one project. 
    • $40 Million for trails will leverage other funding and better connect Atlanta's growing trail network, providing low-stress spaces for walking, wheelchairs, biking, etc.
    • $15 Million more for bike lanes, in addition to bike lanes installed as part of the safer streets projects. 

    2. Corridors on the High Injury Network and our street campaigns for the past five years appear on the lists: 

    • DeKalb Ave multi-use trail (phase two following the phase 1 safety improvement project underway on DeKalb as of December 2021)
    • Cascade Road multi-use trail (phase two following the phase 1 safety improvement project that broke ground in December 2021). The Atlanta Department of Transportation (ATLDOT) confirmed  that this project will connect Avon Ave with Ralph David Abernathy Blvd. 
    • Ralph David Abernathy - Georgia Ave safe streets and protected bike lanes
    • Lee Street Trail (Southside Bike Project) & Safety Improvements
    • Courtland Dedicated Bus Lanes & Courtland / Piedmont Protected Bike Lanes near Georgia State University 
    • South Boulevard Safe Street & Protected Bike Lane
    • Marietta Blvd Rebuild Local Match & Safety Improvements
    • Central Park Place Safe Street & Protected Bike Lanes
    • South Boulevard Safe Street & Protected Bike Lane
    • Whitehall Safe Street & Protected Bike Lanes

     

    3. Sidewalks get a major boost, using a prioritization method straight from the strategic plan: Safety-Equity-Mobility. 

    Image: from ATLDOT public meeting presentation

    Image: from ATLDOT public meeting presentation

    4. Despite the rushed public engagement process, some changes were made based on community feedback: 

    • Removed: $35M Public Safety Training Facility (the final list includes $4.5M for Public Safety Improvements and $15M for 911 Call Center)
    • Added:  
      • Conley Road SE Safe Street (connects Moreland Ave)
      • Wisteria Sidewalk (Kirkwood neighborhood)
      • Erin Avenue Sidewalk Replacement & Beltline Connection (Capitol View neighborhood)
      • McPherson Sidewalk Improvements (East Atlanta neighborhood)
      • Edgewood Bike/Ped Improvements (Boulevard to Interstate)
      • LaFrance Bike/Ped Improvements (Edgewood neighborhood)
      • Allene & Avon & Beltline Pedestrian Safety Sidewalk Connection (Capitol View / Adair Park neighborhood)

     

    Background & Recommendations

    Our Equity & Mobility policy agenda called for the City of Atlanta to renew the TSPLOST (Transportation Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax) and to prioritize sidewalks and street safety improvements by allocating 50% of the funding to each.

    We wanted the City to select projects based on equity and safe access to transit — starting with High-Injury Network communities — and to consistently and transparently report on its progress. 

    In November 2021, the City held 8 public meetings about a proposed city infrastructure fund to pay for the tremendous backlog of city infrastructure. The fund was to include a bond (basically, debt incurred by a governmental entity to pay for needed projects and repairs) and TSPLOST (a sales tax on goods and services that is dedicated to transportation). 

    Photo: Screenshot from ATLDOT public meeting

    Legislation

    1. Bond: 21-R-3928 A RESOLUTION BY COUNCILMEMBER CARLA SMITH TO INITIATE THE CALLING OF AN ELECTION TO DETERMINE THE ISSUANCE OR NONISSUANCE, BY THE CITY OF ATLANTA, OF GENERAL OBLIGATION PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT BONDS IN AN AGGREGATE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT SUFFICIENT TO FUND PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT CAPITAL OUTLAY PROJECTS CURRENTLY ESTIMATED TO COST APPROXIMATELY $400,000,000.00. THE PROPOSED GENERAL OBLIGATION PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT BONDS ARE EXPECTED TO CONSIST OF (1) A SERIES OF BONDS TO BE ISSUED FOR THE PURPOSE OF PAYING THE COSTS OF THE ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, RECONSTRUCTION, RENOVATION, REPAIR, IMPROVEMENT, CRITICAL CAPITAL MAINTENANCE AND EQUIPPING OF PUBLIC STREETS AND TRAFFIC CONTROL INFRASTRUCTURE AND EQUIPMENT, CURBING, STORM WATER DRAINAGE, STREET NAME AND DIRECTIONAL SIGNAGE, BRIDGES, VIADUCTS AND RELATED PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO STREET LIGHTS, SIDEWALKS, BICYCLE LANES AND TRANSIT STOPS, SO AS TO IMPROVE THE PEDESTRIAN AND TRANSIT ENVIRONMENT, THE COST OF COMPLIANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990, FOR SUCH IMPROVEMENTS AND OTHER COSTS INCIDENT THERETO; AND (2) A SERIES OF BONDS TO BE ISSUED FOR THE PURPOSE OF PAYING THE COSTS OF THE ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, RECONSTRUCTION, RENOVATION, REPAIR, IMPROVEMENT, CRITICAL CAPITAL MAINTENANCE AND EQUIPPING OF MUNICIPAL FACILITIES, INCLUDING BUILDINGS, RECREATION CENTERS AND OTHER FACILITIES AND RELATED PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS AND THE COST OF COMPLIANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990, FOR SUCH FACILITIES AND IMPROVEMENTS AND OTHER COSTS INCIDENT THERETO; TO DIRECT THE APPROPRIATE OFFICERS AND STAFF OF THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE TO DETERMINE THE DATES AND THE MAXIMUM RATE OF INTEREST THE BONDS, IF ISSUED, SHALL BEAR AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE MATURITIES OF THE BONDS AND OTHER PARAMETERS; AND TO DIRECT THE APPROPRIATE OFFICERS AND STAFF OF THE LAW DEPARTMENT TO PREPARE A SUPPLEMENT TO THIS RESOLUTION, WHICH SUPPLEMENT SHALL CONSTITUTE THE ELECTION CALL RESOLUTION, TO INCLUDE SUCH PARAMETERS AND ALSO PROVIDE FOR THE LEVY AND COLLECTION OF AN ANNUAL TAX FOR PAYING THE PRINCIPAL OF AND INTEREST ON THE BONDS, IF APPROVED BY THE VOTERS; TO PROVIDE THAT ANY OR ALL OF SUCH BONDS MAY BE MADE SUBJECT TO REDEMPTION PRIOR TO MATURITY; TO PROVIDE THAT THE BONDS, IF APPROVED BY THE VOTERS, MAY BE ISSUED, SOLD AND DELIVERED AT ONE TIME OR IN SEPARATE SERIES FROM TIME TO TIME; AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.

    2. TSPLOST: 21-R-3927 A RESOLUTION BY COUNCILMEMBER CARLA SMITH CALLING FOR THE IMPOSITION, BY THE FULTON COUNTY COMMISSION, OF A TRANSPORTATION SPECIAL PURPOSE LOCAL OPTION SALES AND USE TAX (“TSPLOST”), TO FUND TRANSPORTATION PURPOSES AND A REFERENDUM ELECTION THEREON; TO APPROVE THE SUBMISSION OF A LIST OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS AND PURPOSES TO FULTON COUNTY; TO SPECIFY THE AGGREGATE MAXIMUM COSTS OF SUCH PURPOSES TO BE FUNDED BY THE TSPLOST; TO SPECIFY THE MAXIMUM PERIOD OF TIME THE TSPLOST WILL BE IMPOSED; AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.


  • Summerhill Bus Rapid Transit: Let's make Atlanta's first BRT route a success!

    As an organization that envisions an Atlanta where everyone moves safely, easily, and sustainably throughout the city, we were very pleased when MARTA launched efforts to build Bus Rapid Transit lines in Atlanta.

    Read more

  • First 10 speed cameras in Atlanta school zones coming soon

    Updated March 2022

    Every day, thousands of Atlanta children walk or bike to school in the city of Atlanta. On the way, they wave at neighbors, get exercise, chat with friends.

    And all too often, they face life-threatening risks from speeding drivers. 

    Read more

connect