our guiding principles - we believe in: sustainable transportation options that are as  accessible, prevalent, and respected as driving  is today social and racial justice as outlined by The  Untokening’s Principles of Mobility Justice. We are  committed to building a transportation system that  ensures access to opportunity through investments  that repair the harmful effects of institutional racism  and foster an inclusive community collaboration and are committed to working  collectively with and in service to community accountability and are committed to transparency  and openness to ideas, feedback, and growth that  build trust effectiveness and are committed to forethought,  adaptability, persistence, and resourcefulness to  foster progress

Our priorities during the COVID-19 crisis

As we adjust our priorities in these uncertain times, we think it’s key to focus on people with essential jobs--the backbone of our society who so often get overlooked or taken for granted--and their transportation needs. Here are some ways we’re aligning our work with the urgent needs in our city.

We cannot have mobility justice without racial justice. We are an organization dedicated to reclaiming Atlanta’s streets as safe, inclusive, and thriving spaces for people to ride, walk, and roll. We talk a lot about re-envisioning streets as inclusive public spaces. Seeing our streets militarized is the antithesis of what public space should be about. Safe streets involve more than bike lanes and traffic calming. They are streets where everyone is free from persecution and violence. Safety and inclusivity mean Black people can walk our streets without fearing an assault on their lives or their dignity. Read more...


  • Latest from the blog

    What's happening on DeKalb and Cascade?

    The City of Atlanta has two main transportation funding initiatives: the Renew Atlanta bond approved by voters in 2015 and the transportation sales tax (TSPLOST) voted in during 2016. By 2019, the City announced it had less money and higher project costs than anticipated. As a result, the original project lists would have to be reprioritized. Public participation in this process resulted in a clear mandate for the City to focus on building “complete street” projects; however, not all of those projects made the final list.  As a result, we focused our 2019-2020 street campaigns on two complete street projects with strong community support that were not fully funded: Cascade Avenue in SW Atlanta and DeKalb Avenue in the southeast. We worked with community members in neighborhoods along both corridors to organize street actions and engage residents and businesses to advocate for safety improvements through the resurfacing projects that were funded for each. As a result, we were able to get some of the changes we wanted. Read more for the current status of the projects and what your support and advocacy have helped accomplish so far! We'll also share what we're working on next when it comes to street campaigns and our goal of holding the City accountable to build the projects in its plans. 
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    Reviewing the City of Atlanta Tactical Urbanism Guide

    In August, we blogged about the City’s anticipated tactical urbanism permit program with examples of tactical urbanism (also known as popup or demonstration projects) and opportunities for community groups to design and implement low-cost improvements to roadways and other public spaces. We’ve pushed for an expedited approval process to allow neighborhoods to safely, efficiently, and legally implement these projects for years, most recently through our 2020 Legislative Policy Agenda.  In October, the Atlanta Departments of City Planning and Transportation released the Atlanta Tactical Urbanism Guide, which includes a list of eligible projects, design standards, and materials palette. The guide also describes the process for approval, with a list of required documents. We’re excited to see the City support local efforts to make small but incremental changes in Atlanta neighborhoods, and we believe these temporary projects can harness our community’s creative talent to make a lasting impact on the safety and vibrancy of our streets! What follows here is a brief review of the Tactical Urbanism guide and the submission process: what we like, what we would like to see added, and key changes to make the process smooth and accessible for all residents. These suggestions will be sent to the City, and we will keep you updated. We are also planning to participate in a small tactical project with a neighborhood to provide additional feedback.
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