Match me!

  • signed Pledge for Safe Streets 2019-04-03 15:38:51 -0400

    Take the Safe Streets Pledge

    8% of streets in the City of Atlanta account for 88% of traffic fatalities. 

    As more Atlantans seek ways to opt-out of traffic, get active, and strengthen community connections, the lack of safe streets for people walking, biking, scooting, or waiting for the bus is unavoidable. 

    From 2014 to 2016, 75 people died and 872 were severely injured in collisions on Atlanta’s streets. These were crashes involving people driving, biking, and walking. The majority of severe injuries and fatal crashes occurred on only a handful of city streets known as the “High-­Injury Network”. How can our city eliminate traffic deaths? Cities across the world have adopted Vision Zero policies with the aim to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries. Background: Why we can't ignore Atlanta's High Injury Network

    479 pledges

    We're calling on the City of Atlanta to:

    1. Fund and build all the promised Renew/TSPLOST Complete Streets

    2. Officially adopt a Vision Zero program that puts safety and equity first 

    3. Prioritize the High-Injury Network streets for safety interventions

    Sign the pledge to say YES to funding, building, and creating safe streets for all.

    (Note that we request your address because we need to show that there is broad, citywide support for safe and Complete Streets. We do not share your information with anyone.)

    Goal: 1,000 signatures

    Once we reach our goal, we'll send this petition to Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms.

    Add Pledge

  • Prioritize the Renew Atlanta/TSPLOST Complete Street Projects Prioritize Complete Streets

    November 21, 2018
    Contact: Ben Foster
    4048811112

    November 15, 2018

    This week, Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms launched an effort to prioritize the Renew Atlanta/TSPLOST project list, after she identified major funding shortfalls that would jeopardize long overdue projects that were overwhelmingly approved by voters. As stated in the presentation to the Atlanta City Council Transportation Committee, Renew Atlanta/TSPLOST will prioritize projects based on the safety, mobility, and affordability goals established in the Atlanta Transportation Plan (ATP).

    Statement of Atlanta Bicycle Coalition Executive Director Rebecca Serna:

    The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition agrees that these goals are fundamental for the construction of Complete Streets. Equity and access are inextricably tied to safety on Atlanta’s streets, and many of the Complete Street projects directly address the dangerous conditions on the High-Injury Network, in which less than 8% of Atlanta’s streets account for 88% of fatalities and 52% of severe injuries. The High-Injury Network is not equally distributed throughout the city -- the majority of streets are located west of Northside Drive or south of I-­20.

    This is an opportunity for the Mayor to deliver on Renew Atlanta/TSPLOST and restore public trust in the City’s capacity to build meaningful transportation projects. For years, Atlantans have invested their time to attend and give feedback at public meetings about Complete Streets, but instead of greater mobility, in return, they’ve gotten long delays. We’re ready for a new start and we’re hopeful that by following the guiding principles of safety, mobility, and affordability set forth in the Atlanta Transportation Plan, we will see Complete Street projects break ground next year.

    It will take bold leadership and vision to get us there - and we’re ready and willing to put in the work alongside the Mayor to make our streets safer for everyone.

    If you voted for safe and Complete Streets that provide more mobility and transportation options for everyone, please take the Renew Atlanta/TSPLOST survey and make sure these projects get built.


  • published Shop in Get involved 2018-11-01 15:33:21 -0400

    Shop 2018 Atlanta Streets Alive x BlackCatTips Tees & More!

    27000090632_045cfc4674_c.jpg

    Stay tuned - our new online store with your favorite ABC and I Bike ATL tees coming soon.


  • published Atlanta's most popular bike lane needs you in Blog 2018-09-28 20:18:52 -0400

    Atlanta's most popular bike lane needs you

    Are you one of the 2,700 daily riders on the 10th Street protected bike lane who have been affected by the latest festival-related lane closure or the missing flex posts? The recent bike lane and sidewalk closures on 10th Street raise serious questions about how we prioritize and define transportation -- especially when it comes to Atlanta's most popular bike lane.

    Read more

  • published Peachtree Street for a New Era in Blog 2018-09-28 20:17:35 -0400

    Peachtree Street for a New Era

    How do you design Peachtree Street for a new era? The answer's in the street - its past, present, and future. You can be part of the next chapter of our most iconic street when you visit Atlanta City Design's Shared Street Pilot at the Atlanta Streets Alive - Central on Sunday, September 30th. Through this pilot, we want you to experience a street that's a destination worth traveling to, not just driving through.

    Read more

  • published #4ATLDOT in Advocacy Campaigns 2018-09-28 20:16:48 -0400

    Time to create an ATL DOT

    73 your supports

    The City of Atlanta faces major challenges in the realm of transportation, mobility, affordable housing, equity, climate change, and traffic safety.

    In 2018 alone, the City will adopt an ambitious Comprehensive Transportation Plan, manage the rise of micro-mobility (scooters and dockless electric bikes), create affordable housing strategies around access to reliable transportation, deal with a backlog of Complete Streets projects under the Renew Atlanta program, meet the goals of Bloomberg's American Cities Climate Challenge, and, finally, confront the reality that the high concentration of crashes on Atlanta's High-Injury Network are preventable.

    Is our current transportation structure up to the task? 

    In 2017, Councilmember At-Large Andre Dickens commissioned a study to find out. The feasibility study was an exhaustive independent review of our current transportation structure. Relying on dozens of stakeholder interviews with transportation professionals both in and outside Atlanta along with a comparative analysis of 11 peer cities across the U.S., the report found alarming deficiencies in our current structure. It proposed that the City "set a goal of consolidating all transportation functions in the City into a stand-alone transportation-focused department, led by a new Commissioner [and] name the agency the 'Atlanta Department of Mobility and Streets (ADMS).'"

    Creating an Atlanta Department of Transportation would restructure our current transportation, public works, and planning tools in order to better leverage resources and streamline project delivery. It would be more efficient and better able to implement a strong vision for our city's equitable future.

    The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition supports a stand-alone department dedicated to streets and mobility. Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, Councilmember At-Large Andre Dickens, and Councilmembers and City Leaders across Atlanta agree that the time is now.

    What do we want?

    After reviewing the feasibility study, our preferred option is for the Mayor to appoint an “Interim Director of Transportation” to establish the department with minimal political pressure.

    After 9 months, the mayor would then appoint a permanent Director of Transportation to implement the strategic plan, facilitate communication within existing departments, and engage employees and stakeholders in the process of governance restructuring.

    The Director of Transportation will report to the Mayor and Chief of Staff and will lead both the reorganization process and the newly created department. 

    How can you help?

    There are two things you can do right now.

    1. Sign the petition. That way we can communicate any urgent developments around this issue.

    2. Show why you're #4ATLDOT. Keep the conversation going by adding your reasons why it's time for an Atlanta Department of Transportation on Twitter:Tweet: This is why it's time #4ATLDOT -

    Add Your Support

  • Monroe Drive and Boulevard Draw Attention to Urgent Need for Complete Streets

    Three years after voters overwhelmingly approved the Renew Atlanta bond, in March 2015, just one out of the fifteen Complete Street projects has been completed and only two projects have progressed beyond a quarter of a percent complete.

    Now, we're seeing one project after another get kicked down the road to 2020, according to the Renew Atlanta Complete Street Project pages. Construction on phase 1 of DeKalb Avenue was scheduled to start this year but now it won't start until 2020; Cascade Road was also going to start this year but now it's been delayed until 2020. The same goes for Howell Mill Road.

    After the most recent open house for Monroe Drive/Boulevard Complete Street, which failed to include a road diet north of 10th Street, it's become clear that the city needs to commit to these Complete Street projects.

    Read more

  • There's Still Time to Make Monroe Drive a Safe, Complete Street

    "I can make a coffee table book of all the crashes I've seen from my front porch," said Kim Wilson, a resident who lives on Monroe Drive. Her child is starting at Grady High School in the fall and she's terrified of letting them walk to school on a street where car speeds exceed 50 mph. "What's it going to take to address safety? Is it going to take another student dying?"

    People who walk or bike on Monroe Drive between Piedmont Avenue and 10th Street must compete with speeding cars and dangerous intersections on a daily basis. These conditions are unacceptable. Voters overwhelmingly approved the Renew Atlanta Bond in 2015 because Complete Street projects like the one on Monroe Drive/Boulevard promised to make our streets safer for everyone. The latest Renew Atlanta plans for Monroe Drive north of 10th Street preserve the same old design that virtually ensures that Monroe Drive remains a highway that endangers everyone from people like Wilson's child to rush hour car commuters. Check out the video below for reactions from residents on Monroe Drive north of Ponce de Leon, then join us as we demand the road diet be added to the Monroe Drive/Boulevard Complete Street Project. 

    Read more

  • published Response to the Fiscal Year 2019 Proposed Budget in Blog 2018-06-24 17:23:51 -0400

    Response to the Fiscal Year 2019 Proposed Budget

    Thank you to all of our members who asked City Council for $2.5 million in funding for bike infrastructure and maintenance in the Fiscal Year 2019 Budget, and to all the City leaders who greeted the request with enthusiasm. Unfortunately, the funding was not allocated this year. While we’re disappointed, we’ve already begun planning our campaign for next year’s budget cycle! 

    Read more

  • 134,000 People Power Westside Atlanta Streets Alive

    Last Sunday, 134,000 people powered the Westside Atlanta Streets Alive on Howell Mill Road and Marietta StreetAt the Westside Atlanta Streets Alive kickoff, we celebrated the Marietta Street Resurfacing Project with Councilmember Dustin Hillis (District 9 - Northwest Atlanta) and Renew Atlanta, the department responsible for the resurfacing project that will add 1.6 miles of bikes lanes to Marietta Street. Councilmember Hillis declared "Westside Bestside!" and the Phoenixes took flight. And what followed was one of our largest open streets activations in Atlanta history.

    Read more

  • #Budget4Bikes - $2.5 Million in the FY2019 City Budget

    We’re advocating for $2.5 million in funding for bike infrastructure and maintenance in the city’s FY2019 Budget. The funding will help the city set realistic goals for bike network expansion that can be delivered in a single political term. At approximately $100,000 per mile, the city could build 20 miles of bike lanes annually. Along with projects with other funding sources, this would help reach our goal of 200 miles of bikeways by 2021, while also setting aside $500,000 annually for maintenance."

    Let's make sure the city budget reflects our future priorities. Tell your councilmember to #Budget4Bikes before the Monday, June 18th, Council Meeting!

    SCROLL TO BOTTOM OF PAGE FOR EMAIL TIPS

    Read more

  • published Atlanta Releases 1st Annual Bike Report in Blog 2018-03-28 15:05:38 -0400

    Atlanta Releases 1st Annual Bike Report

    bike_report_1.png

    We are thrilled that the City of Atlanta has released its first Annual Bicycle Report, and we will work with the Mayor to continue building on the achievements outlined in the City's report. Our Executive Director Rebecca Serna told CBS46 in an interview about the report that "a street safe enough for someone to ride a bike on is also safer for everyone else".

    Read more

  • published Atlanta on the Move Mayoral Forum in Blog 2017-09-27 16:14:42 -0400

    Mayoral candidates gather for a lively discussion on biking, walking, and transit

     

    Thank you to the partners, attendees, and Mayoral candidates who participated in the Atlanta on the Move Mayoral Forum. More than 300 people attended the event and 2.2 thousand people have viewed the Facebook Live feed. While there was unanimous support among the candidates for 100 new miles of bike lanes by the end of their mayoral term and the creation of an Atlanta Department of Transportation, candidates took different approaches to questions about MARTA expansion, affordable housing and building community support for bike lanes. Many attendees said that they now have a better understanding of where these candidates stand on issues they care about. But our work isn't finished!

    Read more

  • signed Howell Mill Road 2017-08-25 22:37:10 -0400

    30 signatures

    Howell Mill Road and Marietta Street are the primary roadways for what was once a heavy industrial meat-packing district on the Westside. Now, development, density, and desirable destinations have exploded in the area and exposed the need for a safer and more accessible way to connect this critical north-south corridor to the rest of the city. Marietta Street bike lanes were added in December 2018. The Howell Mill Complete Street remained in the Renew Atlanta/TSPLOST prioritization process in early 2019.

    Now the City needs to build the Howell Mill Complete Street.

    Howell Mill Road is a key north-south corridor that connects the Upper Westside, Georgia Tech and Downtown Atlanta. Howell Mill Road, between Collier Road and W. Marietta Street, is set to become a Complete Street through the Renew Atlanta bond, which was overwhelmingly approved by voters in 2015.

    After a well-received public meeting on October 26, 2016, which covered the main elements of the Complete Street project, the project has remained dormant. What we see on Howell Mill Road is a street that hasn't kept up with development, density, and vision of a corridor that prioritizes the needs of people who bike, walk, and drive.

    Ultimately, the success of this north-south corridor depends on the successful implementation of the Howell Mill Road Complete Street project, which in turn connects to the DeKalb Avenue Complete Street project.

    Failing to create a safe, direct bicycle connection between Marietta and Howell Mill Road violates the recommendations made in the Cycle Atlanta Plan Phase 1.0.

    cycle_atlanta_plan.PNG

    Add Signature

  • posted about Moreland Ave on Facebook 2017-06-02 15:31:03 -0400
    I want protected bike lanes on Moreland Avenue

    19 supports

    moreland-ave-image.png

    The goal of this state road project is to make Moreland Avenue safer for people on foot and on bike, between Mansfield and Austin Aves. (Several years ago, a person riding a bike was killed in this section as they pulled out onto Moreland.)

    The state DOT's concept report states "studies show that an increase in pedestrian, cycling and vehicular volumes has taken place along the corridor. Crash data from 2008-2013 indicates that approximately 252 crashes occurred along SR 42/Moreland Ave from Dekalb Ave to McClendon Ave. Of these crashes, six were pedestrian injuries and one was a bike fatality." 

    Neighborhood bike advocates and the City of Atlanta Planning Office have been involved in the design, and did not settle for painted bike lanes. Instead, the current design includes a raised bike lane, as well as wider sidewalks and safe crossings. While barrier-separated, protected bike lanes on busy roads are always the safest option, they may not be possible on Moreland because NACTO guidelines recommend a minimum of 3' to add a raised barrier.

    Here’s what was presented at the public meeting June 7, 2017:

    • Bike lanes raised 3” above the street level and 3” below the sidewalk level.

    • Bike lanes would be 7’ wide - including a 2’ painted buffer.

    • Timeline - During Summer 2017, they will stripe standard bike lanes for a quick safety improvement and reduce lane widths on general lanes to reduce speeds. In 2019, bicycle lanes upgraded to raised.

    Here's what we told GDOT - feel free to include this in your comment supporting the project:

    1. We support high quality, raised bike lanes and pedestrian crossings for SR 42/Moreland Avenue from Dekalb Avenue to Mansfield Avenue. 
    2. To make the project even better, find a way to add a barrier between the raised bike lane and the general travel lane, so that people on bikes are separated from all those trucks. While the idea of separating people on foot from those on bikes is a good one, it's all relative. Trucks have the potential to do more damage to a person biking in a crash, so we think it's more important to separate those two modes from each other.

    3. Add a crossing near the DeKalb Avenue interchange, and make the exit ramp from DeKalb form a "T" intersection, to encourage drivers entering Moreland to make a full stop first.

    4. We like the diagonal crossing at Euclid as a way to make that crossing safer and easier for people on bikes, and it helps make up for the lack of bike lanes north of Euclid. 

    Read GDOT's Response to Public Comment Here: GDOT's Response to 6/7/17 Open House Comments

    Add Support

  • published Blog 2017-05-31 14:55:08 -0400

    Staff and Board Updates
    Posted by · May 20, 2019 3:29 PM

    Cascade Can't Wait for Safety Improvements
    Posted by · May 20, 2019 3:28 PM

    Shifting Gears Students Are on a Roll!
    Posted by · April 29, 2019 9:30 AM

    See all posts

  • signed DeKalb Avenue 2018-12-20 21:02:08 -0500

    125 signatures

    DeKalb_Image1.png

    DeKalb Avenue is fast, dangerous, and out of control. In 2015, Atlanta voters overwhelming approved the Renew Atlanta Infrastructure Bond to update and improve our streets, including a Complete Street for DeKalb Avenue. After three years of public meetings, funding for the Complete Street on DeKalb Avenue was cut, leaving only resurfacing and reversible lane removal in the budget.

    Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms identified major funding shortfalls in the Renew Atlanta/TSPLOST programs that would jeopardize long overdue projects overwhelmingly approved by voters in 2015 and 2016. Safety, mobility, and affordability are at the heart of Atlanta’s Transportation Plan which was recently approved by City Council.

    In April 2018, we transformed DeKalb Avenue at Atlanta Streets Alive - Eastside74,000 people biked, walked, skated, or pushed strollers at Atlanta Streets Alive. That’s nearly a week’s worth of car traffic crammed into 4 hours on a street that carries about 15,000 vehicles per day. This route connected 11 Atlanta neighborhoods -- Downtown, Sweet Auburn, Old Fourth Ward, Cabbagetown, Inman Park, Little Five Points, Reynoldstown, Candler Park, Edgewood, Lake Claire, and Kirkwood

    Following our successful Atlanta Streets Alive, Renew Atlanta led a public meeting where they stated that the Complete Street project would be divided into two phases, beginning with the removal of the reversible lane. Phase 1 never happened and the reversible lane still remains.

    Our vision for DeKalb Avenue

    2017_07_10_DeKalb_and_Moreland_70A_(3).jpg

    2017_07_10_DeKalb_and_Oakdale.jpg

    Add Signature

  • signed City Policy Platform via 2017-02-17 12:46:18 -0500

    Atlanta is poised to take the next big leap forward. But it needs elected officials with the vision and commitment to deliver high-quality projects that encourage mobility and discourage snarling gridlock. It needs leaders with the courage to put the safety of people before high-speed traffic that places our families and vulnerable road users at risk on a daily basis.

    We are committed to giving you all the information you need to make the best decision this election cycle. We may not be able to endorse candidates, but we can show you where they stand on issues important you.

     Check out our election resources below and BIKE THE VOTE!

    16 bike and votes

    These are the core policies and goals we believe the next Mayor and City Council must adopt if Atlanta wants to continue to compete for the best talent in the world while improving the quality of life for Atlantans who have been historically disadvantaged and marginalized by a lack of transportation options. 

    policy2.png

    infrastrucut2.png

    Safety2.png

    access2.png

    Questions about our platform or our engagement events? Please contact Bennett Foster at ben@atlantabike.org or call 404-881-1112 x 2.

    Add Bike and Vote

Policy and Campaign Manager at the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition
$235.00 raised
GOAL: $1,000.00

connect