Rebecca Serna

  • signed 2021 Policy Agenda 2021-03-26 13:43:06 -0400

    It's time for Atlanta's leaders to elevate safe, equitable, sustainable mobility solutions to the top of the agenda.

    Join the movement by signing on to our policy agenda today.

     

    Thank you to our partner organizations who have signed our 2021 Policy Agenda!

    ARCHI Collaborative Logo  ASAP Logo   Georgia Bikes logo   

    Georgia Conservation Voters logo     

    89 signatures

    Explore our 2021 Policy Agenda Recommendations for City of Atlanta and Atlanta Board of Education:

    City of Atlanta: Safety

    Make streets measurably safer for people biking, walking, and using scooters or wheelchairs.

    Explore Safety Recommendations

    City of Atlanta: Transit & Affordability

    Increase access to transit and affordability of housing.

    Explore Transit & Affordability Recommendations

    City of Atlanta: Funding

    Comprehensively fund Atlanta's sustainable transportation infrastructure.

    Explore Funding Recommendations

    Atlanta Board of Education

    Make it possible for kids to safely get to and from school on foot, bike, transit, and other modes.

    Explore Board of Education Recommendations

     

    We urgently need Atlanta's leaders to adopt and implement equitable mobility recommendations.

    Transportation is an essential part of everyone’s life. When it doesn’t work well, we miss out on job opportunities, have limited access to housing options, are exposed to unsafe streets or polluted air, or have our freedom of movement restricted due to the lack of reasonable options. When transportation is good, it is essential — even enjoyable, because it just works. We might notice kids biking to school, experience the ease of crossing the street safely, or relax while listening to music as we look out the window from a bus in a dedicated lane.

    Yet as the pandemic continues, people face greater risks and barriers while in transit. Despite fewer miles driven, more people died on Georgia roads in 2020, likely due to an increase in speeding. And, people riding public transportation experienced dramatic cutbacks to bus routes, leading to longer walks to the nearest bus stop, often on streets that lack sidewalks.


    This policy agenda is about creating viable transportation options that are safe, easy, accessible, and enjoyable for everyone.

    Equitable transportation policies and projects provide physical and social mobility, as well as access to living-wage jobs, affordable housing, healthcare, and quality education. Affordable mobility options give people economic and social opportunities, especially in communities racially profiled for disinvestment that continue to suffer disproportionately from traffic fatalities. Green options reduce the transportation sector’s impact on climate change, an existential threat to communities.

    Working with our partners and stakeholders, we created three policy recommendation categories: Safety, Transit and Affordability, and Funding. In addition, we have a policy agenda for the Atlanta Board of Education. Please join us in sharing these recommendations with our leaders as we work to create a more equitable city through mobility.

     

     

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  • donated 2020-03-25 21:04:30 -0400

  • Rapid Response Required by City for Safe Streets

    We are experiencing a breaking point in Atlanta’s mobility landscape. With the rise of shared mobility devices including e-bikes and scooters,  almost weekly we are reminded that streets built to prioritize cars aren’t sufficient for present-day Atlanta. People are dying. The narrative of putting the onus on the victims or people that choose to use these devices for last-mile connectivity—or even for fun—unfairly removes the responsibility from the people with the power to enact immediate solutions.

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  • signed Cascade Road/Avenue 2019-03-06 15:22:32 -0500

    [This page has been updated with information about changes to the project that resulted from advocacy campaigns. For status updates on the Cascade project, visit the Renew Atlanta / TSPLOST webpage. Construction was initially scheduled to start in December 2020 but as of January 2021, it has been postponed to summer 2021.] 

    Cascade Road, Cascade Avenue, and Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard are three sections of one critical corridor that serves dozens of Southwest Atlanta neighborhoods.

    Two of the three sections, Cascade Road and Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard, are part of the High-Injury Network and ranked among the most dangerous roads in the city of Atlanta. The third section -- connecting these two High Injury streets -- is Cascade Avenue.

    On January 19, 2019, David Gordon, a 52-year-old beloved longtime resident of Cascade Ave, was struck and killed by a driver while crossing Cascade Ave. He was in a crosswalk. The collision happened less than a quarter-mile mile from where the street name changes to Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard.

    A “Complete Street” project was proposed in 2016 to address the hazardous conditions on Cascade Avenue, where David lost his life, but the construction funding was cut due to budget shortfalls. At the same time, thanks to the persistent work of community leaders and local advocates, in March 2019 Cascade Road in District 11 received funding to become a Complete Street. (Complete Streets are roads with safe spaces for people in all modes of transportation, whether they are walking, biking or scooting, and driving.) A section of Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard in Westview was funded as well and completed in 2018. 

    🎉 Party Popper Emoji Following a community-led #RespectCascade action to highlight the urgent need for safety improvements on Cascade Avenue, the City of Atlanta revised the Cascade Complete Street project to include some safety improvements that could be added during the street resurfacing. Elements include bus stop enhancements, bicycle lanes, and pedestrian safety improvements.

    We will continue to support communities along Cascade Ave in calling on the City of Atlanta to keep the vision of a safer, more accessible Cascade corridor alive. 

    308 signatures

    On the crash heat map below, the intersection of Cascade Avenue and Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard is marked by glowing red and yellow embers, meaning many people walking have been hit by cars at this crossing. 

     

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  • published In your community in Engage 2014-04-01 15:54:03 -0400

    http://www.city-data.com/forum/atlanta/1577701-discovering-atlantas-neighborhoods-3.html

    GET INVOLVED IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD & NPU, AND GET TO KNOW YOUR CITY COUNCIL MEMBER

    In a city of neighborhoods, safe streets for all begins at the neighborhood level. Here's how you can help make streets safer for everyone.

     

    1. Join your neighborhood association. Attend meetings, speak up, and vote for policies and projects that will make streets safer for walking, biking, and people in wheelchairs and provide better access to transit for your community. Find out if there's a transportation committee and join if so - many recommendations made at the committee level get approved by the neighborhood association. 

    2. Find your Neighborhood Planning Unit, also known as NPU, and attend monthly meetings. The City of Atlanta is divided into twenty-five NPUs: "citizen advisory councils that make recommendations to the Mayor and City Council on zoning, land use, and other planning issues.  It is also used as a way for citizens to receive information concerning all functions of city government."

    3. Because many of our calls to action involve contacting an Atlanta City Councilmember, get to know yours ahead of time! Click here to find your representative on the Atlanta City Council. Send them an email introducing yourself and sharing your desire for safe streets in your community. Follow them on social media to keep the conversation going! 

    4. Once you are familiar with what's been happening at the neighborhood association and NPU level, at some point you may want to step into a leadership role. Neighbors can be the most effective advocates for safe streets in communities. Neighborhood chairs and other officers can join our Community Advocacy Network: a space for neighborhood transportation leaders to connect, share information, and learn from each other. 

     


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