Ricardo Vera

  • signed Safe Speed Limits 2019-08-23 14:34:24 -0400

    Make Atlanta streets safer by setting safe speed limits

    It’s a constant complaint in every neighborhood meeting: Drivers are going too fast. For some Atlantans, it’s just a nuisance or a fact of life in a city. For people who use our streets outside of vehicles (that’s everyone at some point), even a small increase in driving speed becomes a matter of life or death in a collision. 

    In 2018, 6,283 pedestrians and 857 cyclists were killed in the U.S. That means a pedestrian or cyclist was killed somewhere in the U.S. every 73 minutes. That number is the highest it has been in 30 years, even though overall traffic fatalities went down slightly last year. This doesn’t include an unknown number of scooter-related fatalities since they rolled out nationwide since 2018.

    On top of that, children, older adults, and people of color face a disproportionate risk of injury and death walking on our streets. This is a serious issue in Georgia. Our state moved from #10 to #6 in a national ranking of pedestrian danger based on fatalities from 2008 to 2017.

    Atlanta stands out when it comes to deaths in pedestrian crashes by population. In 2017, Atlanta ranked 23rd out of the 175 largest cities in the nation for our pedestrian fatality rate: that’s how many pedestrians were killed as a percentage of total traffic fatalities. What that number tells us is that pedestrians are especially vulnerable in our city.

    Slower streets are safer and better for people.

    It’s simple: The faster a driver is going in a collision, the more likely a pedestrian will be killed or seriously injured. That seems obvious, but it’s important to understand that a small change in speed can have a significant difference in the outcome. From a driver’s perspective, the difference between 15 mph and 30 mph is a light tap on the gas pedal. For a person walking across the street, a small change in speed can be the difference between a bad day and a life-changing injury or death.

    Research by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety finds that the risk of severe injury or death of a pedestrian quickly increases with speed. 

    Research by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety finds that the risk of severe injury or death of a pedestrian quickly increases with speed. The risk for children and elderly pedestrians is even greater at lower speeds. The animated graphic below was created by ProPublica from the same AAA data: 

    (Source: ProPublica animation of data from AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.)

    On top of that, the popularity of SUVs brings a higher risk of injury and death when compared to conventional cars, in part because it’s more likely that pedestrians will be run over rather than roll up onto the hood. We’ll save the topic of distracted driving for another day (it’s not good).

    It’s not only the force at which a driver strikes a pedestrian that is important. Higher speeds reduce the sight distance and reaction time a driver needs to avoid a collision in the first place. The images below show a driver’s field of vision at different speeds. When speed goes up, it’s more difficult for drivers to see and respond to objects and people outside that view.

    driver's peripheral vision - stopping distance - crash risk at 10-15 mphdriver's peripheral vision - stopping distance - crash risk at 20-25 mph (reduced)

    driver's peripheral vision - stopping distance - crash risk at 40 mph + (greatly reduced)(Source: NACTO Urban Street Design Guide)

    Reducing speed limits is an effective way to reduce speed.

    Cities across the United States and the world are reducing speed limits as one way to reduce traffic fatalities and injuries. Vision Zero is an international movement that Atlanta must join if we are going to truly realize our commitments to equity, mobility, and sustainability. That’s why speed limits and Vision Zero are important parts of Atlanta Bicycle Coalition’s policy platform.

    By reducing the speed limit, top outlier speeds are reduced. In Boston, default speed limits on most local streets were set at 25 mph. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety found the odds of drivers exceeding 35 mph fell by almost 30%. In Seattle, the city has established 25mph speed limits on all its arterial streets and 20 mph on all its local streets. In a pilot study in Springfield, Missouri, reducing the speed limit in some neighborhoods from 30 mph to 25 mph had a proven effect of slightly slowing down all driver speeds, even with no other street changes. 

     

    Citywide speed limits are still a relatively new trend in the United States and it will take more time to see data on their benefits. There is a large body of evidence in other countries showing the safety benefits of reduced speed limits. In Bristol, UK, researchers found a 63% reduction in fatal injuries since a city-wide 20 mph (30 kph) speed limit was enacted.  

    Lower speeds don’t necessarily mean it will take longer to get where you’re going in a city. During the times of day when traffic in Atlanta is the most congested, speeds on many streets average less than 25 mph. What's more, 25 mph allows vehicles to travel a more consistent pace with fewer stops and starts, smoothing traffic flow. In fact, in congested conditions, traffic can flow better at lower speeds. Often in Atlanta, drivers are only driving at high speeds between traffic lights, which is both unsafe and inefficient.

    Redesigning streets takes a lot of time and money. We will continue to advocate aggressively for engineering solutions to make our streets safer, including protected lanes, crosswalks, traffic calming, signal phasing, and much more. Lower speed limits won’t solve everything, but lower speed limits will help save lives right now while we continue investing in the future.

    It's time to adopt safe speed limits in Atlanta.

     

    Join us and our partners in calling on the City of Atlanta to reduce the speed limit on city streets to 25 mph.

    Neighborhood associations:

    Center Hill Neighborhood Association

     

     

     

     

     

     

    66 supports
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  • signed LIT Lanes Now 2019-08-23 14:33:55 -0400

    LIT Lanes Now

    247 signatures

    The city of Atlanta has approved permits for 12,000 scooters, and thousands of people ride scooters each day. This highly visible and growing demand for transportation options beyond cars requires changes to the street to create safe spaces for scooters. Fortunately, bikes and scooters have a great deal in common, including benefiting from the same kinds of infrastructure - lanes separated from motor vehicles. 

    To provide safe travel for people on bikes and scooters, we need to connect and protect a network of "LIT" lanes. We use LIT to stand for Light Individual Transportation, what some people call scooters and bikes, or micromobility. 

     

    Park Place protected lane 2015 (R. Serna) & 2019 (D. Givens)

    The city of Atlanta has some 118 miles of bike lanes today but is missing a core network in the busiest parts of town. 

    What's more, many of our lanes fail to protect riders. Lanes are littered with debris and trash, faded to the point of disappearing or are blocked by delivery trucks. We all recognize that a stripe of paint that often ends suddenly, right where you need it the most, is not enough.

    That’s why we applaud the City of Atlanta’s commitment to connecting and protecting lanes for people on bikes and scooters announced by Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms Friday, August 16. 

    "In the next 30 days, we plan to implement changes to our streets to better protect everyone. We will use temporary barriers, painted demarcations and any tool we can find to complement our growing network of 118 miles of dedicated space for bikes and scooters."

    That's exactly the kind of rapid response we called for following the death of the fourth person riding a scooter in the Atlanta area this year.

    Cascade Avenue 2019

    Yet we can’t fail to notice that while people riding scooters are attracting a great deal of attention right now, people walking, biking, and waiting for the bus have been overexposed to unsafe streets for decades

    Building safer streets should start with the communities facing the greatest exposure to harm today. In a city like Atlanta, where economic inequity is among the highest in the country, the City’s ONE Atlanta vision of an affordable, resilient, and equitable Atlanta must be reflected in the allocation of space on city streets. 

    Women and people of color are riding scooters in high numbers, according to one scooter company. People earning $25,000 to $50,000 a year are most enthusiastic about scooters and other LIT devices, while those making more than $200,000 are the least, according to transportation researchers. And women are more likely to support micromobility than men.

    The City of Atlanta is among a growing number of cities who have adopted transportation plans emphasizing safety, equity, and mobility

    Taking fast measures to change how space on city streets is allocated is essential to our growth and maturation as a city. 

     

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  • donated via 2019-02-07 19:18:46 -0500

    Your membership makes it possible for us to advocate for safer streets, policies, and infrastructure at City Hall like the new City of Atlanta Department of Transportation, lead community-building events like Atlanta Streets Alive, our award-winning open streets initiative, and provide free bike education and safety classes!

    Benefits of being a member

    • $50+ Donors receive a 2nd membership card for a family member
    • $125+ provides helmets for kids at one Shifting Gears school. Donors receive an Expect Bikes t-shirt
    • $250+ pays for one free bike education class. Donors receive an Expect Bikes hoodie
    • $1,000 and above - donations at these levels make our advocacy work for safe streets possible! Donors at this level will be invited to join our new Momentum Makers giving circle. Momentum Makers are the first to hear breaking news, with communications from our Executive Director. Momentum Makers are also invited to an annual celebration connecting them with decision-makers and other Momentum Makers, 2 complimentary tickets to our annual Fall Fundraiser, and an Expect Bikes hoodie.

    All members receive

    • Ticket to our Annual Blinkie Awards
    • Discounts at local bike shops and other businesses

    You can also make your membership donation by check!  Make checks payable to Atlanta Bicycle Coalition and mail them to 

    889 Wylie Street SE
    Atlanta, GA 30316
    When you donate via our website, your sensitive information is protected by SSL encryption per our hosting arrangement with NationBuilder.com
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  • signed ATL DOT 2018-10-03 08:28:18 -0400

    Time to create an ATL DOT

    77 your supports

    The City of Atlanta faces major challenges in the realm of transportation, mobility, affordable housing, equity, climate change, and traffic safety.

    In 2018 alone, the City will adopt an ambitious Comprehensive Transportation Plan, manage the rise of micro-mobility (scooters and dockless electric bikes), create affordable housing strategies around access to reliable transportation, deal with a backlog of Complete Streets projects under the Renew Atlanta program, meet the goals of Bloomberg's American Cities Climate Challenge, and, finally, confront the reality that the high concentration of crashes on Atlanta's High-Injury Network are preventable.

    Is our current transportation structure up to the task? 

    In 2017, Councilmember At-Large Andre Dickens commissioned a study to find out. The feasibility study was an exhaustive independent review of our current transportation structure. Relying on dozens of stakeholder interviews with transportation professionals both in and outside Atlanta along with a comparative analysis of 11 peer cities across the U.S., the report found alarming deficiencies in our current structure. It proposed that the City "set a goal of consolidating all transportation functions in the City into a stand-alone transportation-focused department, led by a new Commissioner [and] name the agency the 'Atlanta Department of Mobility and Streets (ADMS).'"

    Creating an Atlanta Department of Transportation would restructure our current transportation, public works, and planning tools in order to better leverage resources and streamline project delivery. It would be more efficient and better able to implement a strong vision for our city's equitable future.

    The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition supports a stand-alone department dedicated to streets and mobility. Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, Councilmember At-Large Andre Dickens, and Councilmembers and City Leaders across Atlanta agree that the time is now.

    What do we want?

    After reviewing the feasibility study, our preferred option is for the Mayor to appoint an “Interim Director of Transportation” to establish the department with minimal political pressure.

    After 9 months, the mayor would then appoint a permanent Director of Transportation to implement the strategic plan, facilitate communication within existing departments, and engage employees and stakeholders in the process of governance restructuring.

    The Director of Transportation will report to the Mayor and Chief of Staff and will lead both the reorganization process and the newly created department. 

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  • signed Policy Platform 2017-09-23 21:24:27 -0400

    Atlanta is poised to take the next big leap forward. But it needs elected officials with the vision and commitment to deliver high-quality projects that encourage mobility and discourage snarling gridlock. It needs leaders with the courage to put the safety of people before high-speed traffic that places our families and vulnerable road users at risk on a daily basis.

    We are committed to giving you all the information you need to make the best decision this election cycle. We may not be able to endorse candidates, but we can show you where they stand on issues important you.

     Check out our election resources below and BIKE THE VOTE!

    17 bike and votes

    These are the core policies and goals we believe the next Mayor and City Council must adopt if Atlanta wants to continue to compete for the best talent in the world while improving the quality of life for Atlantans who have been historically disadvantaged and marginalized by a lack of transportation options. 

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    Questions about our platform or our engagement events? Please contact Bennett Foster at ben@atlantabike.org or call 404-881-1112 x 2.

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