stephen spring

  • published Ticket Diversion in Classes 2019-06-20 13:03:59 -0400

    Ticket Diversion

    To help promote understanding and awareness of the proper use of bicycle routes, bicycle lanes, multi-use trails, and learn how vehicles share public space within the City of Atlanta, the City Solicitor’s Office, in collaboration with the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition, developed a Diversion Program to provide education on bicycle safety and traffic laws for both drivers and bicyclists.

    City Ordinance 19-O-1110

    The first class is anticipated to launch in the autumn of 2019. Contact the Office of the City Solicitor at (404) 658-6163 regarding options for citations issued in May through October.

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  • signed Cascade Road/Avenue 2019-10-08 13:33:18 -0400

    Cascade Road, Cascade Avenue, and Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard are three sections of one critical corridor that serves dozens of Southwest Atlanta neighborhoods.

    Two of the three sections, Cascade Road and Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard, are part of the High-Injury Network and ranked among the most dangerous roads in the city of Atlanta. The third section -- connecting these two High Injury streets -- is Cascade Avenue.

    On January 19, 2019, David Gordon, a 52-year-old beloved longtime resident of Cascade Ave, was struck and killed by a driver while crossing Cascade Ave. He was in a crosswalk. The collision happened less than a quarter-mile mile from where the street name changes to Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard.

    A “Complete Street” project was proposed in 2016 to address the hazardous conditions on Cascade Avenue where David lost his life, but Renew Atlanta cut the funding because of budget shortfalls.

    Thanks to the persistent work of community leaders and local advocates, in March 2019 Cascade Road in District 11 was funded to become a Complete Street. Complete Streets are roads with safe spaces for people in all modes of transportation, whether they are walking, biking or scooting, and driving. The Cascade Road project will improve access to the Cascade Springs Nature Preserve and create safer streets for biking, walking and driving. A section of Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard in Westview was funded as well and completed in 2018. 

    The Cascade Avenue section of the corridor received design-only funding for the Complete Street and a budget to resurface the road. Resurfacing this section of Cascade Avenue allows for some minimal safety improvements, such as narrowing lanes and repainting existing crosswalks. What it doesn’t pay for are things like Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons (essentially a red light to protect people using crosswalks), medians, and sidewalks.

    Join communities along Cascade Ave in calling on the City of Atlanta to create a safer Cascade through the funded resurfacing project. 

    305 signatures

    On the crash heat map below, the intersection of Cascade Avenue and Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard is marked by glowing red and yellow embers, meaning many people walking have been hit by cars at this crossing. 

     

    Add Signature

  • signed Pledge for Safe Streets 2019-04-25 09:35:42 -0400

    Take the Safe Streets Pledge

    As more Atlantans looks for ways to opt-out of traffic, get active, and strengthen community connections, the lack of safe streets for people walking, biking, using wheelchairs, scooting, or waiting for the bus is unavoidable -- and unacceptable.

    From 2014 to 2016, 75 people died and 872 were severely injured in car collisions on Atlanta’s streets. These were crashes involving people driving, biking, and walking.

    Most of the severe injuries and fatal crashes occurred on just a handful of city streets -- what's known as the “High-­Injury Network”. In fact, less than 8% of streets in the City of Atlanta account for 88% of traffic fatalities. Read more on why we can't ignore Atlanta's High Injury Network.

    We believe no one should die during their commute or using the Atlanta roads. 

    We can do something about traffic deaths. Cities across the world have adopted Vision Zero policies aimed at eliminating all traffic fatalities and severe injuries while increasing safe, healthy, equitable mobility for all. Cities are also investing in transportation systems and infrastructure that provide Safe Streets for All, by reducing motor vehicle speeds to safe levels and providing safe spaces for all different ways of getting around. 

    1,383 pledges

    Join us as we call on the City of Atlanta to:

    1. Officially adopt a Vision Zero program that puts safety and equity first 
    2. Fund and build safe streets for all through approved plans including Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms' Action Plan for Safer Streets
    3. Prioritize the High-Injury Network streets for safety interventions

    Sign the pledge to say YES to funding, building, and creating safe streets for all.

    Goal: 1,000+ signatures

    Update: We've delivered over 1,000 signatures to Mayor Bottoms! Yours will help us demonstrate the growing demand for Safe Streets.

    (Note that we request your address because we need to show that there is broad, citywide support for safe and Complete Streets. We do not share your information with anyone.)

    Add Pledge

  • signed ATL DOT 2018-10-02 09:29:37 -0400

    Time to create an ATL DOT

    77 your supports

    The City of Atlanta faces major challenges in the realm of transportation, mobility, affordable housing, equity, climate change, and traffic safety.

    In 2018 alone, the City will adopt an ambitious Comprehensive Transportation Plan, manage the rise of micro-mobility (scooters and dockless electric bikes), create affordable housing strategies around access to reliable transportation, deal with a backlog of Complete Streets projects under the Renew Atlanta program, meet the goals of Bloomberg's American Cities Climate Challenge, and, finally, confront the reality that the high concentration of crashes on Atlanta's High-Injury Network are preventable.

    Is our current transportation structure up to the task? 

    In 2017, Councilmember At-Large Andre Dickens commissioned a study to find out. The feasibility study was an exhaustive independent review of our current transportation structure. Relying on dozens of stakeholder interviews with transportation professionals both in and outside Atlanta along with a comparative analysis of 11 peer cities across the U.S., the report found alarming deficiencies in our current structure. It proposed that the City "set a goal of consolidating all transportation functions in the City into a stand-alone transportation-focused department, led by a new Commissioner [and] name the agency the 'Atlanta Department of Mobility and Streets (ADMS).'"

    Creating an Atlanta Department of Transportation would restructure our current transportation, public works, and planning tools in order to better leverage resources and streamline project delivery. It would be more efficient and better able to implement a strong vision for our city's equitable future.

    The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition supports a stand-alone department dedicated to streets and mobility. Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, Councilmember At-Large Andre Dickens, and Councilmembers and City Leaders across Atlanta agree that the time is now.

    What do we want?

    After reviewing the feasibility study, our preferred option is for the Mayor to appoint an “Interim Director of Transportation” to establish the department with minimal political pressure.

    After 9 months, the mayor would then appoint a permanent Director of Transportation to implement the strategic plan, facilitate communication within existing departments, and engage employees and stakeholders in the process of governance restructuring.

    The Director of Transportation will report to the Mayor and Chief of Staff and will lead both the reorganization process and the newly created department. 

    Add Your Support

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